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Thought, Word and Deed by Thou Divine Majesty - written by Len Holmes

Larry Eubanks, Rev. PhD.

Writes an inspired blog on “thinking about the Bible” topics as he flows
seamlessly onto a world stage of contemporary Christian writers.

In his September 16, 2016, blog he writes that to understand the New Testament one should stop reading it, temporarily. We are invited to open the Old Testament and begin to know it better as the Prophets proclaim the Glory of God to his people for all generations what God is with and without all the Law and the Prophets.

As a Christian in the pre-apocalyptic era, how do I think about the Holy Bible?
I think in a rationally emotive fashion as my learning has occurred. We are products of ecclesiastical thought offered in my case from those who were inspired to or not to impart foundations for Christian beliefs for me to grow into the furthering of Christ's Kingdom here on earth, as it is in Heaven.

We think like the ancient Greeks as Dr. Eubanks adroitly states that if you were to ask a Greek about time he would include lots of ideas, examples of mathematics, to prove a point. I would give that kind of answer due to the Western education I have received.

In contrast, if one asked a Jew about time as Dr Eubanks points so well, a story would be told. Both answer the question well. And again as Dr Eubanks mentions the Holy Bible as canonized is a Jewish book in thought. Yes, the New Testament is written in Greek; but the ideas are Jewish that is Christian faith.

It comes down to this.
It is an acceptance that the Holy Bible is the inspired word of God. The ancient Jews of the Old and and some of the New Testament would agree with that.. When Jesus said, “All the Law and the Prophets,” that is what was meant.
On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets.
Matthew 22:40 KJV

WHAT WERE THESE TWO COMMANDMENTS THAT JESUS GAVE IN MATTHEW 22:40?
He unabashedly stated to love God and your neighbor, and on those two principals of love hangs all the law and the prophets all neatly tied in one package.
 How simply complex conundrum of a paradigm this is for the modern day Christian. It is the purpose of story telling, like any art form to invoke an emotion. Jesus Christ is the superstar of invocation in past, present and future of our lives.
One emotion that is arguably present in Christians and non-believers of all times from (the beginning) is anger that arises from the question, who is my neighbor?

It is embedded in the sacredness of the Eucharist to be in love and charity with your neighbor and if not, make it right.

Anger arises in Christians even when their cup is spiritually full, maybe too full, which implies that we should get out of the pew and share our love and blessings with our neighbor whomever they are, even if we have to turn the other cheek in doing so.
 I think Christianity is a religion of pay-it-forward for the debt Christ paid, not just for our sins, but for the sins of the whole world. He died and rose again that those who believe on him will have eternal life. What about those who do not believe? He died for them as well. Who are we to criticize for whom Christ died and rose again on the third day? Yet, the simple emotion of anger keeps us from addressing the eternal notion. Is it our darker nature that causes this? We are commanded to be Christ-like, but can we be one hundred percent? No.

The beginning of knowledge is FEAR of the LORD; 
we are not to lean on our own understanding.

The first seven verses of Proverbs written by King Solomon, an ancestor of Jesus of Nazareth, is as a tree in a garden with many levels of meaning in its parts.

First, the number seven in Jewish thinking is a number that expresses completeness. That is my Greek thinking about Jewish writing showing. Yet, in these seven proverbs it gives seven simple steps for loving your neighbor as Jesus commanded.
First idea
Who?
This is a King of Israel, seed of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob giving prophecy who was an earthly ancestor of Jesus of Nazareth and Son of David.
Solmon Says


Second Idea

What it is...?

IS

To perceive the words of understanding
.
IS

To know wisdom and instruction.

Third Idea

To perceive the words of understanding
receive the instruction of

wisdom
justice 
judgment 
equity.

Fourth Idea 
How? 
Give Subtlety
to the simple.

My Greek learning interprets the Jewish narrative:
Subtlety offers gullible persons insight. Matthew Henry states, “We have to feel our own ignorance to be taught”.
And to the young knowledge and discretion. 

Fifth Idea
Who?
The same rules apply to all. 

Sixth Idea
A wise person will seek out interpretation of the meanings of scripture and dark sayings, within such as Samson's knot in Judges where Samson was the last Judge and a Nazarene like Jesus, Isaac and John the Baptist.


Within the times of Samson the number seven appears in that seven times the nation of Israel turned against God. The lesson here is that God had rather forgive than judge.

Seventh Idea

The truest knowledge is the fear of the Lord. Fools and blasphemers cannot grasp this concept of loving the Lord your God with all that is within you.

These seven ideas from Proverbs command us to love one another, and our neighbor as they provide the Christian reflection for Matthew 22:40. The old becomes new again!

Len Holmes

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