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Homersley Genealogy by Len Holmes

Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547)
King of England from 21 April 1509 until his death. He was the first English King of Ireland, and continued the nominal claim by English monarchs to the Kingdom of France.
 CALENDAR FOR YEARS OF REIGN OF HENRY VIII

ADD THE NUMBER OF YEARS TO 1509

CALENDAR FOR THE YEARS OF REIGN OF EDWARD VI
Edward VI (12 October 1537 – 6 July 1553)
He was crowned on 20 February at the age of nine.
HE RULED FOR 16 YRS

ADD NUMBER TO 1547
CALENDAR FOR THE YEARS OF MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTTS
1 October 1553, Gardiner crowned Mary at Westminster Abbey
She died on 17 November 1558
ADD NUMBER TO 1553

CALENDAR FOR YEARS OF REIGN OF ELIZABETH I
Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603)
Crowned 15 January 1559
44 year reign
ADD NUMBER TO 1559

CALENDAR FOR YEARS OF JAMES VI SCOTLAND
AND I (FIRST) OF ENGLAND
James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death 1625. James was the son of Mary, Queen of Scots, and a great-great-grandson of Henry VII, King of England and Lord of Ireland (through both his parents), uniquely positioning him to eventually accede to all three thrones. James succeeded to the Scottish throne at the age of thirteen months, after his mother Mary was compelled to abdicate in his favour. Four different regents governed during his minority, which ended officially in 1578, though he did not gain full control of his government until 1583. In 1603, he succeeded the last Tudor monarch of England and Ireland, Elizabeth I, who died without issue. [Wickapedia]
 THE BEGINNING OF JAMES' REIGN IS 1603. HE DIED IN 1625.
ADD ANY YEAR TO 1603 THRU 1625

CALENDAR YEARS FOR CHARLES I
Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649[a]) was monarch of the three kingdoms of England,
Scotland, and Ireland from 27 Mar 1625 until his execution in 1649. 

Charles was crowned on 2 February 1626 at Westminster Abbey, but without his wife at his side
because she refused to participate in a Protestant religious ceremony.

ADD THE NUMBER OF YEARS TO 1626

At about 2:00 p.m. Charles put his head on the block after saying a prayer and signaled the executioner when he was ready by stretching out his hands; he was then beheaded with one clean stroke.

Yet in one clean stroke the world changed. The English Monarch's age was stopped by Oliver Cromwell 1649, after the proclamation of the republican Commonwealth.

NOTE; DOCUMENTS DURING THIS TIME HAVE TWO DATES: Julian Calendar 45 BC-1582; Gregorian cutting 10 days from the calendar in 1582 (so that 15 October 1582 followed 4 October 1582 cutting 10 days from the calendar in 1582 (so that 15 October 1582 followed 4 October 1582).

Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) [c] was King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. He was King of Scotland from 1649 until his deposition in 1651, and King of England, Scotland, and Ireland from the restoration of the monarchy in 1660 until his death.

Recognised by Royalists in 1649 
Gregorian Calendar prominent.The regnal calendar ("nth year of the reign of King X", etc.) is used in many official British government and legal documents of historical interest, notably parliamentary statutes.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_monarchs

Scottish Records Association
http://www.scottishrecordsassociation.org/index.php/news-archive/11-news-events/archive/12-the- calendar-and-related-problems

Medieval source material on the internet: 
Heralds' Visitations and the College of Arms http://www.medievalgenealogy.org.uk/sources/visitations.shtml

https://archive.org/details/collectionsforpt205stafuoft

This text has many citiations of Homersley in 1614 and features the years of 1663 and 1664.
This is the text that shows the intermarriage of the Floyer and Homersley families with Arms and trees noted. The Arms of the families are unique and are modified from time to time to reflect lineage, residence, royal offerings. The laws of primogeniture usually follow. (Eldest son rule)


SO HOW ARE THEY KIN TO ME?

THE TREE IS PRESENTLY ALLIGNED AS GARNETT HOLMES OF VIRGINIA
AS THE HOME PERSON. THE DESCENDANCY IS HIS.
Page 117 features an early scheme of the descendancy of Homerlsey of Homersley. Remember that we are viewing a family that there is about 400 years already of presence in England. If you recall, the Homersley genealogy begins in Provence, France (what is now) in the 13th century AD.

Why would a future Englishman be in Provence in the 13th century?

Answer is a soldier.
16 November 1272 – 7 July 1307Not for those specific times, but that was Edward I. More than likely he, as a common soldier was employed by his mother the famous Eleanor of Provence. So you can begin to see the English population there which was intermingled with lots of Vikings. After all, William was a Norman of France and routed as much of the Viking power out. But it has only been since 1066 that the change began, and oh how it did. The Viking descendants had begun with the earliest invasions of England and the setting up of the Saxon State such as Mercia where the present political boundaries Stafford Shire.

HOW ARE THE EARLIEST HOMERSLEY'S PORTRAYED?
The earliest Homerlsey portrayals are written and discussed in Judith Richards Shubert's Blog, Genealogy Traces. She is a 4th great granddaughter of Garnett Holmes.

Ade le Kinge de Rowenhall which translates Adam who lives on lands of the King at Rowenwald; or as my 4th Cousin would say, he was a King of Rowenwald because he lived on land of the King.

Adam of Rowenwald, Staffordshire
1260—1318
That is 194 years after the 1066 Conquest. Many records are vague in this time period or absent. The rich and powerful were the ones who left records. Literacy was restricted, heavily. 

Adam had two sons by unknown women most likely in Provence.
By the early 1300s the shape of the name Homersley at Homerlsey was emerging as a family. 
One son, Adam de Homerley 1325-1389 created the additional name of Kingsley.
Unfortunately, this is our line to Garnett and it is not as published or as colorful as the brothers' line.

Greg Holmes would say, it is from the Dilhorne, Staffordshire that we descend. So far that is correct.

That is what the majority of the finds in the 4 or 5 Visitation Books are: 
cousins, and my goodness they glow bright on a tree.

Margaret Hamersley (Hamersley and Homersley are used it seems at random) is the 9th Cousin 6 times removed. Yet her children's names by Floyer are also spelled Flyor and/or Flyer. Their ignoble arms are shown.

At this branch of the Homersley family the Floyer show up as distant autosomal cousins.

Sarah Homersley is an 8th cousin and daughter of Thomas Homersley of Botham, and marries William Trafford of Swithamly Grange, Staffordshire.

page 288 Homersley in 1614 Visitations

The Heraldic Visitations of Staffordshire 

Made by Sir Richard St. George


I think it is important to share everything at this juncture in life. We collectively know more family data than any generation in history. Genealogy research for all of us has gone from our heads in musty courthouse basements and old libraries with a pencil and paper to writing letters defending positions that took weeks to exchange now can be done in the blink of an eye. I intend to research till I can't. All I want to do is to spread information. New researchers are welcome.
Len

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