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Ancestors of Jemima Self




Ancestors of Jemima Self

by Elmo Len Holmes and Greg Holmes


A CELTIC HERITAGE REDISCOVERED

DNA PROVIDES NEW ANSWERS

Jemima Jane Wilmot married Stephen Charlton Shelton about 1759 in Northumberland County, Virginia. Their issue:  Stephen W. Shelton 1760-1828 and William Shelton 1761-1787. Stephen Charlton Shelton died in 1761 leaving Jemima Jane Wilmot Shelton widowed in Northumberland County, Virginia in 1761. William Self, 1704-1791 was in Northumberland County in 1761. It is the writers' contention, and this is original research, that William Self married Jemima Jane Wilmot Shelton in 1761/1762 in Northumberland County, Virginia. Not only are there DNA matches to Jemima Wilmot's direct ancestors, there are also matches to her and Stephen Charlton Shelton's direct descendants. This would mean that Jemima Jane Wilmot Shelton was the mother of William Self's children, and that Hannah, William Self's wife mentioned in his will, was his second wife.

PATRIOTS IN THE PROGENY


LAST MAN TO DIE IN MILITARY ACTION OF AMERICAN REVOLUTION IS


WILLIAM WILMOT


William Wilmot was buried by the British with all the honors of war, having achieved the unique distinction of being the last to shed his life's blood in an engagement between American and British troops during the Revolution. Robert Wilmot was a 3rd Lt. In the Baltimore Militia. 
Source:  Maryland Historical Magazine








*****Correction*****    *****Jemima Jane Wilmot Shelton's father was Robert Wilmot's brother Richard Wilmot 1719-1797. Richard married Mary Gittings*****




RICHARD WILMOT AND GARNET HOMESLEY LIVED IN WARREN COUNTY, KENTUCKY IN THE SAME TIME PERIOD

It is interesting to note here that Richard Wilmot 1773-1840 lived in Warren County, Kentucky, in 1810 and he is listed on the census one page away from Garnet Homesley. We, the writers,  believe this is more than coincidence.




 RICHARD OWINGS


WELSH DESCENT



 CAPTAIN OF THE RANGERS FOR THE DEFENSE OF MARYLAND

CITIZEN CARPENTER


Rachel Owings 1683-1761 was a daughter of Richard Owings 1662-1716 and Rachel Bealle 1662-1729. Rachel Bealle's parents were Ninian Beall 1625-1717 and Ruth Polly Moore 1652-1707. Ninian Beall's parents were Dr James Beall and Anne Marie Calvert. One of the most colorful stories in American History is the story of Ninian Beall, to whom we have a direct genetic match.  This larger than life ancestor was about 7’ tall and red haired Scotsman, adventurer, soldier and father. The name given to him was Ninian by his father and mother which was after St Ninian who brought Christianity to the Celts and that of a Druid Priest.  He was captured by Cromwell and shipped as a war criminal to Barbados and then as further punishment to the Colony of Maryland where he was an indentured servant.

In 1699, Ninian Beall gave land on the Patuxent River for
"Ye erecting and building of a house for ye Service of Almighty God."


Records at Annapolis give the following memoranda of Ninian's Offices:


    1688 - Lt. Ninian Beall

    1676 - Lt. of Lord Baltimore's "Yacht of War, Royal Charles of Maryland, John Goade, Commander"

    1678 - Captain of Militia of Calvert County, Maryland

    1684 - Deputy Surveyor of Charles County

    1688 - Appointed Chief Military Officer of Calvert County

    1689 - Major of Calvert County Militia

    1690 - One of the 25 Commissioners for regulating affairs in Maryland, until the next assembly

    1692 - High Sheriff of Calvert County

    1693 - Colonel, Commander in Chief of Maryland forces

    1694 - Colonel of Militia

    1697 - On a Commission to treaty with the Indians

    1679 - 1701 - Member of General Assembly

    1696 - 1699 - Representative of Prince Georges County in the House of Burgesses



1) Coldham, Peter Wilson. Settlers of Maryland 1679-1783. Consolidated Edition. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, Inc.  2002

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