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Researching Unknown YDNA Genetic Cousins

Genealogy research has a new element with the advent of genetic testing to enhance family history studies. Using the genetic clues often presents more problems to solve than linear research.

The Y DNA genetic clues arrive in the form of earliest known ancestors who have been tested through Ancestry and Family Tree Maker. The two companies seem to have different approaches to the DNA markers. Family Tree Maker's 37-Marker test lists individuals with whom we have a common ancestor. Our Holmes group has no other matches to any Holmes families listed. In fact, with Family Tree Maker we are a miscellaneous group. In Ancestry's 200,000 markers, there is no Holmes either, but there are families who seem to have familial relationships with the Holmes group of our DNA.

I have begun to develop family trees from the matches of these markers and have databases that reveal how the family matches are related.

The families that are interrelated are the Robertson, Greenhaugh, Mosby, Brent, Hatcher, Childers, Baugh, Branch, Burton, James, Talliferro, Foster James, Womack and etc. These name spellings represent a consensus by me of the etymological variations over hundreds of years. I have named this the “Cousins Model” of research. I am sure the wheel is still round; however, there is nothing new under the sun. When considering the use of YDNA research it appears to me to be in my case the name of Holmes linearly which is the traditional research method. This had not been the case as it has been discoveries through the female line that have provided the most results.

Family Tree Maker says that this is coincidence. I am happy with any coincidence that provides answers to my genealogy queries.
 
The first analysis is of the descendants of William Robertson 1620-1708 and Eleanor Dreghorn Pitcairn 1634-1708 of Aryshire, Scotland.  (For a more complete bio sketch of this couple, go to Find A Grave).
One of the early trees developed was a match to John Greenhaugh, which is 458 names over three hundred years of American history.
John Greenhaugh m Unknown and had Elizabeth Greenhaugh who married Benjamin Hatcher of Varina Plantation, Henrico, Virginia. The couple had eleven children between 1668-1685 with information available.
The Robertson’s family may have had fourteen children and down through the centuries the name varied in spelling including Robinson. One clue about the Robertson family is they were ardent Presbyterian.
Jeffery Robertson (1654-bef 1739), son of William and Eleanor, was an immigrant to Henrico, Virginia. He married Elizabeth Bowman (1655-1735) in 1698 in Henrico, Virginia. Elizabeth Bowman’s family has ancestry to the early match of John Greenhaugh (05 Mar 1614-03 Mar 1703). John was an immigrant from Lancastershire, England to Henrico, Virginia. There are some name spelling differences in Greenhaugh, but no definitive data has been drawn.
Anyone with research ideas is welcome to post on this blog about their research conclusions. John Greenhaugh’s wife is a mystery, but some evidence points to her being a Childers. John had one daughter: Elizabeth Greenhaugh (1648-1728) married Benjamin Hatcher (1648-?) of Varina, Dale Parish, and Henrico, Virginia on June 1687.
The Greenhaugh tree now becomes a descendant of the family of William Hatcher (1613-1680). William Hatcher’s family adds the following lines to the genealogy: Edward Hatcher, Sr. (1636-1711) and Mary Ward; Henry Hatcher (1639-1677) and Ann Lound; Jane Hatcher (1641-1710) and William Addie Branch (m 1661), Abel Gower (m 1677), William Baugh, Jr (1656); Susannah Hatcher (1646-1699) and Thomas Burton (1634-1685). 
I will make this data available to anyone who asks. I have data bases on the following families: John Greenhaugh, Edward Mosby, Sarah Woodson, Jane Homersely, Francis Hammersley, Mary Brent, Giles Brent, as well as Holmes and Homesley.

Genetics has advanced the ability to resolve genealogy queries.
Please post any questions to Genealogy Traces.


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