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Showing posts from March, 2014

Elizabeth Frances Holmes

Elizabeth Frances Holmes 1833-1919

Garnett Holmes had three sons: Elias Eph Holmes, Lawson B. Holmes and James A. Holmes. His third son, James A. is my ggg-Grandfather, as well as Greg Holmes’, another author on this blog.

James A. Holmes (1805-abt 1904) married Mary Polly McDonald about 1827 perhaps in Alabama. The couple had five children. The focus of this story is about his only daughter, Elizabeth Frances Holmes Isbell.

We do know through solid research that Elizabeth was born in 1833 in Carroll, Georgia. When she was about fifteen she married Hugh Gentry (Hughel) Isbell (1824-1889) on 26 Oct 1848 in Shelby, Alabama.

They lived and farmed in Shelby, Alabama near Monovello and Sterrett, Alabama at least through 1860. By 1870, Hugh and Elizabeth Frances were living near Hillsboro, Alabama. By this time Hugh was 55 years and Elizabeth was 45 years. In 1870, the census snapshot shows us this growing family:
Hiram 24, William Yancey 21 (already widowed), James W., Julia C. 14, Abel 10,…

The Brent Family

One of the genetic cousins to the HOLMES and HOMESLEY families was the BRENT family of Charles, Maryland and its environs. The colonization of colonial America was a multipurpose tangle of religious, economic and social relationships that often overlapped. The colony of Maryland was no exception. The Brent families were facilitators of all the relationships of Maryland’s settlement and future.

The story of the BRENT family begins in England with Lord of Lark Stoke and Admington Sir Richard BRENT (1573-1662) and Elizabeth REED (1578-1631) when they married in 1594 in Warwickshire, England. The couple had nine children, but the focus of this story is on their youngest son, Giles BRENT (1606-1671) who became the Deputy Governor of Maryland.Giles BRENT was born in Gloucestershire, England and migrated to the English colony probably because of his second son status and the laws of primogeniture of England. He arrived with his more famous sister Margaret BRENT and a retinue of servants. The …

Researching Unknown YDNA Genetic Cousins

Genealogy research has a new element with the advent of genetic testing to enhance family history studies. Using the genetic clues often presents more problems to solve than linear research.

The Y DNA genetic clues arrive in the form of earliest known ancestors who have been tested through Ancestry and Family Tree Maker. The two companies seem to have different approaches to the DNA markers. Family Tree Maker's 37-Marker test lists individuals with whom we have a common ancestor. Our Holmes group has no other matches to any Holmes families listed. In fact, with Family Tree Maker we are a miscellaneous group. In Ancestry's 200,000 markers, there is no Holmes either, but there are families who seem to have familial relationships with the Holmes group of our DNA.

I have begun to develop family trees from the matches of these markers and have databases that reveal how the family matches are related.

The families that are interrelated are the Robertson, Greenhaugh, Mosby, Brent, Hatc…