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Who were Elias Homesley's Parents?

From Ray Homesley's book "Benjamin Homesley and His Descendants" are found Benjamin Homesley's children and Joseph Homesley's children.

Children of Benjamin Homesley and Jemima Self: Joseph, Stephen, Doshia, Jean and Ana

Children of Joseph Homesley and Mary Smith: Garnet, John, Burrell, Patcy, Sarah, Polly and Chaney

Both of these Homesley families lived in Lincoln County, North Carolina.
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To whom was Elias Homesley born? We know he was born about 1796 in North Carolina, and that he married Olliss who was born in Kentucky.

  • Joseph (Benjamin's son) married Barbary Fulks about 1805. On the 1810 census, Joseph and Barbary had three sons under 10 years of age. This rules out Joseph and Barbary as Elias' parents as Elias would have been about 14 in 1810.
  • Stephen Homesley (Benjamin's son) married Esther Roberts in 1809. This rules out Stephen and Esther as Elias' parents.

  • Burrell Homesley (Joseph's son) apparently never married nor had any children.
  • John Homesley (Joseph's son) married Mary Jane James around 1795 in Lincoln County, North Carolina. John's sons James and Burrell were born in Kentucky about 1805 and 1807 respectively, but by 1811 John's family was in Missouri as John's daughter was born there in 1811. Between 1805 and 1811, when John was in Kentucky, Elias would have been 9 to 15 years of age; not of age to marry Olliss of Kentucky.

  • Garnet Homesley married Elizabeth Huffstetler, about 1795 in North Carolina. (Garnet started going by the last name "Holmes" between 1820 and 1830).
    In 1810, Garnet Homsley is listed on the Warren County, Kentucky census with two males under 10, and one male 10 thru 15. This male between 10 and 15 is believed to be Elias Homesley.

    Garnet lived in Kentucky from about 1810 to around 1816/early 1817, as he bought land back in North Carolina in late 1817.  Elias must have stayed back in Kentucky, marrying Olliss when he was about twenty in 1816, and retaining the spelling of his last name of "Homesley" prior to Garnet going by "Holmes" starting in the 1820's.
    Garnet's younger two sons were Lawson and James, both of whom took up the "Holmes" name by 1830.
It is interesting to note here that Garnet's son James Holmes named three of his sons Lawson, James and Elias. Also, Henry Huffstetler (Huffstickler in later years), brother of Elizabeth Huffstetler, named three of his sons Lawson, James and Elias.
 
Elias Homesley moved to the Pickwick Lake area prior to 1830 as he is listed on the census in Hardin County, Tennessee in 1830.


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