Skip to main content

Palo Pinto Academy 1883

PALO PINTO COUNTY – Palo Pinto Academy opened on the 15th of October with 70 pupils, and has now about 100. B. F. Weaver succeeds D. P. Deaver, deceased, as Principal. The prospects for the tone of future instructions is flattering in the county. Out of 22 certificates issued, about half are first grade, and only one third grade. There are 38 communities in the county, and but 22 as yet have teachers. The teachers are thinking of organizing an institute soon, and one of the first things to be considered is the establishment of a teachers’ library. It is believed that a library will help to avoid the rock (want of interest) upon which many county institutes split.

Texas School Journal, Volume I
By Texas State Dept. of Education
Texas Educational Journal Publishing Co., 1883



 Maybe Mr. Weaver used Andrews' Lunar Tellurian to instruct his pupils. As shown in the diagram: A. The globe ball.  S. Arc of the sun's circumference, drawn upon the same scale as the globe. Extend the arc S until a circle is completed, and this circle shows the size of sun upon the same scale as the globe represents the earth.  B. The circle of illumination, showing how far the sunlight extends.  C. The twilight circle showing how far the twilight extends.  D. The moon ball, showing the light and dark hemispheres of the moon. The gearing at F keeps the light hemisphere always toward the sun.  E. Plate showing the inclination of the moon's orbit.  G. A calendar index.  L. Pointer showing the position of the sun's vertical ray.  H. A longitudinal or time index, used to find time of sunrise and sunset, length of days, nights and twilight.  J. The ecliptic.  K. The equator.

SOURCES:

Texas school journal, Volume 1 (Google eBook), Texas State Dept. of Education, Texas Educational Journal Publishing Co., 1883, http://books.google.com/books?id=bv0BAAAAYAAJ&pg=PP1#v=onepage&q&f=false

Gross, H. H. (1881). Teachers' manual for Andrews' lunar tellurian. Chicago: A.H. Andrews & Co.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

A Gailey Cousin Christmas Tree Tradition

Most of my family reunions and get-togethers have been centered around holidays or special events. It's hard to pick out a special personality (we have several - as I'm sure most of you do) and I've thought about all of the pets we've had in the past, the special heirlooms that grandma loved to display during the holidays and I'm really having a hard time coming up with a single one.

My aunt Irene and uncle Raymond always had the big get-togethers at their house, because it was the largest, had acres of pecans trees to play under and they had the most grandchildren! Of course, all of that was later, after all six of us cousins had grown up and had children of our own.

Thinking of Christmas, my mind keeps going back to the time before I moved into Grandma and Doc's home and we celebrated at our house. I remember getting a beautiful bride doll one Christmas. Wish I still had that doll. Have no idea where she traveled to after she got married. And then there was o…

January River of Small Stones - Jan 5, 2012

Acrostic: Bobby
BOBBY


Bushy brows draw together as the old man draws paint Over the wood – he tried to make his shaking hand glide smoothly. Both the paint and the brush left a squiggly line, By the look of his face You knew he was not pleased with his efforts.
January 5, 2012

My Home Town by Dorothy Hansen

My Home Town

For thirty years this California town
has been the place where I have slept at night,
and shopped, and worked, and driven about.

But home is where my childhood feet
ran bare on Texas clay …
on streets that were like arteries
to all the lives I loved and shared.

Now, as storm clouds gather in November
and leaves are on the ground,
these asphalt streets and stranger’s cars
seem even more remote.

I long to live where I am known,
and my grandparents, too …
where all the folks I meet each day
know just where I belong.

They’ve known my folks and relatives.
They’ve seen me go through school.
I have a place on Texas soil
in the town where I was born.

It is my home, belongs to me,
and I yearn for a hearth that’s gone.

From Dorothy Hansen's “Cedar Berries,” her collection of poems about Texas.


Dorothy Lee Hansen wrote this poem about my home town of Mineral Wells, Texas. She was born there in 1925 and is of my mother's generation. From what I have read about her she was full of life…