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Mineral Wells A Story About Change


Jessie Teddlie

"Jessie volunteers to help community and county non-profits to obtain resources for programs to improve our city and county. She writes grants and foundation requests, plans fundraisers, works with city leaders and more to get assistance for youth, elderly, the homeless as well as leading the efforts for introducing and assisting potential local artists.

She is assisting in the renovation of 5 acres and three buildings with an outdoor amphitheater for use as a community used complex for events, an art center, a theater, and a museum. Her efforts have pulled together a partnership for change in Mineral Wells, Texas."

Jessie is a member of my high school graduating class of 1962 and works tirelessly on the renovation project of the Old High School building, the Little Rock Schoolhouse and the Lillian Peak Home Economics Building, and the amphitheater all located in the heart of Mineral Wells. The amphitheater was built in 1937 by the WPA (Work Projects Administration) which was the largest New Deal agency employing millions of people and affecting almost every locality in the United States. The WPA was created by Franklin Delano Roosevelt's presidential order, and funded by Congress on April 8, 1935.

Jessie Teddlie, executive director of the 50 Year Club, the entity that owns the campus of historic buildings, says “Each of these have historical value and the entire complex is being submitted as a Texas/National Historic District.”

"If she can get enough money to complete these two efforts it will stimulate the city leaders and community members to believe that change can happen and jobs can be created through our own efforts and not that of outsiders."

The NAU is a small group of people, committed to the power of business as a force for change. They give 2% of sales to social/environmental organizations. You choose where it goes. Please go to the website link below and vote for Jessie!

http://www.nau.com/collective/grant-for-change/jessie-teddlie-585.html


Other Sources:
http://www.nau.com/partners-for-change/

The Collective | Stories About Movement | Nau.com

http://www.mineralwellsindex.com/local/local_story_114205252.html

50-Year Club.org

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