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Soups from "The Pilgrim Cookbook"




The Pilgrim Cookbook


published by

The Ladies’ Aid Society

of

Pilgrim Ev. Lutheran Church

Cuyler Avenue and N. Lincoln Street

CHICAGO, ILL.


1921



Containing nearly 700 carefully tested recipes

This Book may be obtained from

Mrs. H. C. STEINHOFF,

1840 Cuyler Avenue, Chicago, Ill.

Price: 75 cents

Postage: 5 to 12 Cents, according to Zone



Cream of Green Bean Soup

Cook cut beans and 2 good-sized potatoes till tender; strain, saving water. Take out potatoes and mash them. Brown 1 tablespoon butter and 1 tablespoon lard, add a little flour, the water in which beans were cooked, potatoes, beans and 1 cup cream.—Mrs. A. Piepho.


Beef Soup

Take about 1 1/2 pounds lean chuck and 1 pound smoked butt, cover with water and boil about two hours. Then add 2 large carrots diced, 1 large German celery root or celeriac, 1 large German parsley root, 1 large stalk leek, and boil 1 hour more; salt to taste. Boil dried peas separately, flavor with sweet marjoram and add to soup just before serving. Navy beans may be used if preferred, or dumplings are also very good.—Mrs. W. H. Jacobs.


Beer Soup

Pour 1 pint water in a kettle and set over fire. When hot add 1/2 pint beer, a little salt, 1/2 cup sugar, 1 quart milk, a little flour to thicken and 3 to 4 egg yolks. Serve with toasted bread squares, and on top put the beaten egg whites to which has been added a little sugar and vanilla.—Mrs. H. G. Tischer.


Cherry Soup

One pint canned cherries, 1 quart water, little stick cinnamon, 1 tablespoon farina. Put in some dumplings. Sweeten to taste.—Mrs. A. Steging.


Cream of Tomato Soup

Press enough cooked tomatoes through a fine sieve to make 1 1/2 cups; let puree become very hot. Melt 1/4 cup butter, cook in it 1/4 cup flour, dash of pepper, and 1 scant teaspoon salt. When the mixture is frothy gradually stir in 1 1/2 cups cream diluted with 1/2 cup water. Stir and cook until the sauce boils vigorously, then add the hot tomato puree and remove from fire at once.—Olga T. Bohnsack.


Turnip Soup

Wash, pare and cut into small pieces 1/2 dozen medium sized white turnips. Boil them in unsalted water until tender, then rub through a fine sieve. Chop fine 1 small onion, put in a stew pan with 1 tablespoon butter, and cook slowly without browning for five minutes; then add 1 tablespoon flour and when blended, 1 quart of milk. Stir until boiling hot, add the turnip pulp and season well with salt and pepper. Cook slowly for 5 minutes ; serve at once and pass grated cheese with it. —Mrs. Albrecht.


Wine Soup

Boil 1/2 cup fine pearl tapioca in about 1 quart water till clear; then add a small piece of stick cinnamon, a little salt, 1 large glass wine (white or red), and finally 2 to 3 egg yolks and 2 to 3 tablespoons sugar. Serve also with toasted white bread squares and drop the beaten egg whites in little mounds on top.—Mrs. H. G. Tischer.

Comments

Gini said…
These are wonderful Judy, thank you, makes me want to make soups this weekend!
They do sound pretty good, don't they? Recipes back then were so simple, it seems.
Yummy recipes!

Happy blogoversary!
Thank you, Teena! Let me know if you decide to try one of the recipes.

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