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Baked Pork Chops – A Reminder of Home

Weekly Genealogy Blogging Prompt: Week #6 - Let readers in to your kitchen. Discuss your family’s favorite foods. What was a typical Sunday dinner in your childhood house? What did grandma make that had you coming back for more? Were there any dishes that the dog wouldn’t even eat? Thanks to We Tree for the inspiration!


My father and step-mother, Leon and Mildred Richards in their home September of 1964.


Having grown up in a household where my father was a butcher for the local Safeway store and my mother worked in the same meat department, we had a variety of cuts of meat every day. Breakfast fare usually included thick slices of bacon, smoked, peppered, and honey cured. Occasionally a pork chop made its appearance on our breakfast plate beside the usual eggs and fried potatoes and onion. We didn't have that big of a breakfast every weekday because Mom spent long days at work and school was calling - we usually ran a little late with 4 teenagers and 2 elementary-aged kids to get ready. But the weekends found us all gathered in the country kitchen around the beautiful round oak table that my younger sister now has in her home.

Again on the weekends we enjoyed various cuts of meat that daddy patiently showed us how to prepare. Mom was usually in the garden or making biscuits.

Reminder of Home
I was reminded tonight of the thick pork chops that Daddy used to bring home and stuff with delicious dressing prepared just like you would for the Thanksgiving turkey. He would take a very sharp knife and cut a slit in the meat across from the bone and stuff it with cornbread dressing.

Request for Pork Chop
I had asked my hubby to please bring home some pork chops from the grocery (he usually does our shopping) because we hadn't eaten them for quite some time. He found some beautiful chops that were about 1-inch thick with the bone in. If you sometimes wonder how to cook pork chops that are that thick I find that baking them is probably the easiest thing to do.

Preparation of Meat
I rinsed the meat under running water and patted them dry. I had prepared a basil olive oil mixed with garlic salt and dry Italian seasonings that I placed in a shallow bowl. Then I rubbed this on all sides of each pork chop. I then wrapped them tightly in aluminum foil, placed them in a heavy cast iron skillet to bake in my 350º oven. I baked them for one hour.

They were delicious. And because I had wrapped them in foil I had no mess to clean up. Of course, they could just as easily be cooked in any ovenproof dish and if you chose to not use the foil, the chops would brown nicely. My were not as brown but tasted more like a pork roast.

You should try this method of cooking pork chops. I found I could not "fry" my pork chops all the time. Cooking them this way cuts down on the calories and fat.


Bon appétit.

Posted previously on my blog Food Gratitude, Judith Richards Shubert.

Comments

Janice Tracy said…
Sounds yummy, Judy! And I especially like the idea of no clean-up.
Yes, they are easy and good.
Terri said…
Wow - you made me pretty hungry and it's only 8:00 AM in Colorado -
Another great way to season your chops is to marinate them in Italian dressing - I know it sounds odd - but the viniger tenderizes the meat - plus you get all the yummy spices in a bottle - LOL - My hubby was a meatcutter for Safeway and King Soopers too...
Terri
Thanks, Terri, for the suggestion. The Italian dressing sounds great, too!

Small world isn't it? Did you see my picture of the Safeway employees in Stephenville in my post at Genealogy Traces?
Greta Koehl said…
Oh, pork chops were always such a treat in my family. And the best of all was when my mother would make stuffed pork chops - soooo yummy. You've brought back a lot of memories and made me hungry!
Thanks, Greta! Glad you enjoyed. Now go make those pork chops!
Professor Dru said…
Yum, Yum! And the part about using alumunium foil so that there is is no mess to clean is an excellent tip.
Cousin Linda Richards wrote: "I love that picture of Leon and Mildred I loved them so very much."

Thanks Linda Ruth for reading my blog!

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