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Searching for Arthurs near Ducktown, Tennessee

On top of a mountain near Sylco, Tennessee looking at the Ocoee River

This is in the Cherokee National Forest just northwest of Ducktown. Bob and I were on the road to the old Arthur Community and the Sylco Cemetery. It was a beautiful place.

Photos taken April 30, 2003 by Judy Shubert

No, we didn't find the Sylco Cemetery. I think that it may be overgrown by now or maybe we made a wrong turn somewhere. But like Linda Kay tells me, "Judy, you KNOW they're not there." She loves to tease me about my hunting out cemeteries!

A Miner’s Shoes and Overalls

We spent the night in Ducktown and decided to go to a museum we ran across. These miner’s shoes and overalls were found in the Burra Burra Mining Museum. Just around the corner from this display was an entrance to one of the mining shafts. Those miners had more stamina and guts than I have!

This photo was taken inside the Mining Museum at the Copper Basin in Ducktown, Tennessee. The man giving Bob and I the tour gave me permission to take the photo. He said the workers in the mines were a happy lot and most of the copper mining accidents were single occurances, not accidents that will trap several men at one time as you see in the coal mines because they are mined differently. Bob had asked about that because his great-grandmother's younger brother died in the Muscat mine in 1910. He was only around 28 years old. (More about that later.)



This is a closer look at those folks in the previous picture. Just wish their faces were clearer!

Bob said he felt we were in a time-warp!

Imagine our surprise to round one of those horse-shoe turns up on top of the mountain near Ducktown, Tennessee and see this coming toward you. They were so nice and hated that they "couldn't rightly tell us where that Arthur cemetery was".

I lightened the photo up some trying to see the 2 gentlemen a little better.

You can't imagine how excited I was when I first saw them coming down the road. This reminded me of our ancestors coming across the plains in those Prairie Schooners. There is a story about Grandpa Harvey Puckett and Grandma Alice and Indians and camping overnight! That story reminds me, too, of these two gentlemen. You can find that story in Chapters 1 and 2 of Irene Gailey Stone's Memories – “Grandma in Her Bonnet.”

Comments

T.K. said…
Conestoga wagon with rubber tires! What a great picture, Judy, and I'm envious that you had your camera ready. I still bemoan the day in 1975 when I didn't have my camera ready--a friend and I were driving somewhere in the southwest and we saw a Conestoga Volkswagen van--pulled by two horses, with the driver sitting up on top of the van holding the reins, and as I recall, there was some awesome hippie paint job on the van, too.
Thanks, T.K. I was actually standing in the road taking pictures of a little cabin that was down in a gully to the left in that picture! So, yes, I did have my camera ready. I've had those moments like yours, too. A Conestoga Volkswagen van - how unique!
tipper said…
I live near Ducktown-just over the line in NC. I don't know any Arthurs-but many of my uncles worked in the Copper Mines. Neat post!!
Thanks, Tipper! Glad you enjoyed reading my post. It is so lovely up there in the mountains. Bet you enjoy living in that area. The man in charge of the Burra Burra Mine Museum was so nice. He wrote me a letter later after having investigated my husband's relative that had died in a mine. I'll put it on my blog soon.
Judy
Hello, I found your site in researching the coppermines at Ducktown, Tenn. My great grandfather worked in the mines and I was planning a blog post. I would like to know if I may use a photo you took of the miners in the musuem and give a link back to your page.
thanks
Jeanne Bryan Insalaco
Of course, Jeanne, I would be honored. Let me know when you have it written. I'll want to read it!

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