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Showing posts from October, 2008

Tagging Memories with "Tag, You're It!"

Lisa Louise Cooke has tagged me from over at The Genealogy Gems News Blog.
There's a game of Genealogy Blogger Tag going around and now it's my turn.

Where do I begin? Oh, yes, the questions - should begin like this . . .

10 Years Ago I . . .
1. lost my Mother and drove with my sisters and husband to Blackfoot, Idaho, to place her beside my stepfather.
2. occasionally made draperies for the public.
3. welcomed our first grandson into the family on October 16th.
4. then welcomed our last granddaughter into the family on November 17th.
5. spent our 34th wedding anniversary in the Davis Mountains with my husband.

5 Things on Today's To-Do List
1. Find pictures to carry to North Carolina on Saturday that my daughter hasn't seen.
2. Send list of blogs (late) that I have read and commented on to Looking4Ancestors.
3. Make vegetable soup for tomorrow.
4. Download some pictures from my camera onto my computer before I leave.
5. Mail University of Texas Keepsake Ga…

Fun Friday - Would you Care to Comment?

Challenge was given by Looking 4 Ancestors When my fellow blogger asked me to participate in a challenge I eagerly accepted. It is my first one here at GeneaBloggers on Facebook. The challenge was to leave a personal comment on at least ten of the blogs you read over the weekend. I read ten and more right away, leaving a comment on each of them. I learned so much and found some great blogs that I will follow and have added to my list of “Favorite Blogs”. I think I may have missed the deadline for turning my list in, but here are the ones I read. Take a look at them if you haven’t done so already. You, too, might find a link to a family line that intrigues you.Walkin' the Land of my Ancestors kinexxionsFact or Fiction? THE GRAVEYARD RABBIT: COG 58 Hill Country of Monroe Country"America cultivates the best Germany brought forth” Genealogy Gems PodcastTHE PURSUIT OF DAVID ROBBINS PT 1, PT2, and PT3 West in New EnglandAn unexpected face found … Gen MusingsSmile for the Camera Dre…

Cranberry Salad

If you read the post aboutmy cousin, Julie Martin, you will know that she sent me a surprise Christmas present last year – a box of canned Bing Cherries. This is my husband, Bob’s, favorite dessert. If I don’t have or can’t find Bing Cherries I will make the Cranberry Salad shown below. I think it is just as good. Maybe you will try them both and you decide!


I usually make this version of Cranberry Salad at Christmas because I can rarely find the sweet Bing cherries called for in the Coca Cola salad. This makes a FULL LARGErectangular Pyrex dish 9 x 14 or something like that.

Ingredients:
3 regular packages cherry or strawberry Jell-O
3 cans whole berry cranberry sauce
1 #2 can crushed pineapple and juice

Dissolve Jell-O with 3 cups boiling water. Let cool. Do not let it get firm. Add cranberry sauce and drained pineapple. Divide mixture in 2 parts. Put half in large oblong Pyrex dish and congeal. After it has congealed, spread with mixture of the following:

12 ounces cream cheese
2 tablespo…

Coca-Cola & Bing Cherry Salad

Here is the Coca Cola salad Bob's mother used to make - very sketchy directions but you get the idea. This is also the recipe that uses the Bing Cherries that my cousin, Julie Martin, mailed to me at Christmas.

Ingredients:
1 pkg. Raspberry Jell-O

1 pkg. Cherry Jell-O

2 cans Bing cherries, sweet (drained)

1 small can crushed pineapple (drained, saving some for cream cheese topping)

1 cup nuts

2 bottles coca cola (cold)
She used coke that was sold in individual glass bottles. I imagine they held about same amount as our canned drinks of today.

CongealThen mix one 4 oz. pkg. cream cheese with a small amount of pineapple juice.Sprinkle walnut or pecan pieces to top.Tastes great!

Enjoy!
Copyright 2008 Photo taken by Judy Shubert at The Daily Grind Museum, Mineral Wells, Texas May 20, 2008

Vernelle Gailey Rowbury - Life Sketch by Angie Marek

Edwin C. Rowbury and Vernelle Gailey Rowbury
Circa 1960s
Vernelle was born prematurely along with her twin sister, Maedelle, on September 25, 1924. The twins weighed 2 and 2 ½ pounds. Their first cradles were shoe boxes. They were kept alive by being fed warm buttermilk. The twins were very lucky to have lived through that first winter. Our lives would have been very different had we not had Vernelle.Her twin and her younger sister tell of their mischievous youth. One story that stands out in the minds of Vernelle’s family is when the three of them set the cotton bales on fire! While playing in the cotton fields, the sisters discovered some grapevines and mysteriously produced some matches. The results were disaster! Needless to say they all got a good scolding and a spanking.As most identical twins will, Vernelle and Maedelle often passed as one another. Especially in their teenage years, swapping dates and discipline. By the way, when they would call you they sound exactly the same of…

Searching for Arthurs near Ducktown, Tennessee

On top of a mountain near Sylco, Tennessee looking at the OcoeeRiverThis is in the CherokeeNational Forest just northwest of Ducktown. Bob and I were on the road to the old Arthur Community and the SylcoCemetery. It was a beautiful place.Photos taken April 30, 2003 by Judy ShubertNo, we didn't find the SylcoCemetery. I think that it may be overgrown by now or maybe we made a wrong turn somewhere. But like Linda Kay tells me, "Judy, you KNOW they're not there." She loves to tease me about my hunting out cemeteries!A Miner’s Shoes and OverallsWe spent the night in Ducktown and decided to go to a museum we ran across. These miner’s shoes and overalls were found in the BurraBurraMiningMuseum. Just around the corner from this display was an entrance to one of the mining shafts. Those miners had more stamina and guts than I have!This photo was taken inside the MiningMuseum at the CopperBasin in Ducktown, Tennessee. The man giving Bob and I the tour gave me permission to ta…

Carson Newman Men's Letter Club

Men's Letter Club

"Composed of all men who wear the Varsity C.-N. Monogram in athletics, the Men's Letter Club is active in promoting the interests of the varsity sports and also provides a means of sharing common interests in the world of athletics."
Taken from a 1940 Appalachian
Carson-Newman College Yearbook
Jefferson City, Tennessee
Published by the Senior Class
Yearbook belonging to Ray Allen Shubert, Class of 1941

My father-in-law, Ray Allen Shubert, is in the front row, second from the left. He was a student of Carson-Newman from 1938-1941.

1941 Carson Newman Graduate Ray Allen Shubert Deceased - September 8, 1917 - January 17, 2003

Ray Allen Shubert
1940
Carson Newman College
Jefferson City, Tennessee

Death Notice
The Tennessean, Sunday, January 19, 2003
Nashville, Tennessee

SHUBERT, RAY ALLEN – Age 85, January 17, 2003. He was born September 8, 1917 in Lenoir City, TN. Mr. Shubert was a graduate of Carson-Newman College in Jefferson City, TN. While there he met his wife, Marilee Davis. They were married September 27, 1941. He was captain of the Carson-Newman football team, played on the baseball team and was inducted into the Carson-Newman Athletic Hall of Fame in 1986. He served as President of the Men’s Student Government. He also served in the U. S. Navy in 1941 and retired from Eaton Laboratories. He and his wife were active members of the First Baptist Church of Nashville for more than 50 years.

Mr. Shubert was preceded in death by his wife, Marilee and parents Henry E. and Martha Conner Shubert of Lenoir City, TN. He is survived by sons, Robert A. (Judy) Shubert of Fort Worth, TX and William H. Shubert of Brentwo…

Henry Milton (Mitchell) Shubert - March 07, 1839-June 01, 1915

Back of Photo reads: Nancy Ann Shubert
Blaine Plemons, cousin
Henry Shubert
My search for the Shubert ancestors began with my husband’s great-great-grandfather, Henry “Mitt” Shubert. The search was compelling because my husband’s father told us he had come to the United States from Austria in 1842 when he was a small child. The combination of Austria and the name Shubert was intriguing enough to make me long to find proof of this, even though at the time I knew nothing of genealogy and researching various documents and census records.The search led me to South Carolina and a Robert Shoebird and his wife, Lydia. My father-in-law had never seen a copy of any census and when I showed him the copy of the microfiche page where Robert and Lydia’s names appeared he nearly cried. He was amazed. He said, “There, that’s (Milton) my great-grandfather.” He knew and had already given me all of the other names of the children and parents that appeared in the census. I felt that was a pretty good indic…