Skip to main content

Terrell State Hospital - North Texas Hospital for the Insane

After interviewing several of my uncles and aunts at one of our Richards Family Reunions I learned that my grandparents met while working in Terrell at the Terrell State Hospital. I knew nothing about the hospital and so started trying to find out something about it and in doing so hoped to shed more light on my grandparents young lives. I don't know where they worked in the hospital but because of jobs they had later in life I feel like they probably worked in the housekeeping or food service area. I have copied some of what I have found on other websites about the hospital that I hope you will find interesting.

My grandparents, John Robert Richards and Willie Laura Homsley got married in 1912 so they must have worked at the hospital when the name was the
North Texas Lunatic Asylum. I have not been able to find any employee records from that time.


"Supper for 2000 Patients"
Postcard of North TX State Hospital in Terrell, 1920
Submitted by Elaine Martin

Terrell State Hospital

1200 East Brin St., Terrell, TX 75160

The Terrell State Hospital, first known as the "North Texas Lunatic Asylum" opened on July 14, 1885. In 1888 the hospital was renamed "North Texas Hospital for the Insane". In 1925 the facility was renamed "Terrell State Hospital". The hospital was established for the treatment and care of the "chronic incurable insane" whose care had previously been supplied by county jails or poor houses. It has undergone an almost continuous program of building and enlargement during the twentieth century and provides services to the Texas counties of: Bowie, Camp, Cass, Dallas, Delta, Ellis, Fannin, Franklin, Henderson, Hopkins, Hunt, Kaufman, Lamar, Morris, Navarro, Rains, Red River, Rockwall, Smith, Titus, Van Zandt, and Wood.


Sources:
"TERRELL STATE HOSPITAL." The Handbook of Texas Online. [Accessed Sat Nov 22 18:59:27 US/Central 2003 ] and http://www.terrelltexas.com/health.htm accessed Nov. 22, 2003.
For more information, see the above sources as well as http://www.terrelltexas.com/history.htm and http://www.cityofterrell.org/index.html

Copyright © 1999-2005-2006 by Abby Balderama
Coordinator of the Kaufman County, TXGenWeb Project site
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Comments

Anonymous said…
Judy, I love so much that you are willing to dig into our family history and bring to light for our generations and the generations to follow a sense of where we came from, and who we are!
Peggy
Greta Koehl said…
Judith - I can't believe it - another connection. I am writing another article on my gg-uncle William Henry Lewis and there is a big connection to the North Texas Hospital for the Insane. So I googled it and your blog was the first hit! I'll be posting the article Monday (18 May 2009).
Anonymous said…
Hi :)

I was wondering if you have found any way to get records of employment or patient records? I found these postcards in an antique mall and they were addressed to the asylum. There were 15 post cards in all that I found and I would love to be able to piece together a story.
Just wondering if you found anything in records.
Ashley Davis said…
sorry forgot to leave my contact info...
ashleydavis1964@yahoo.com

Popular posts from this blog

Crazy Sign over Bankhead Highway

Main Street Showing Crazy Sign
Mineral Wells, Texas
The most famous street marker in the south.
Showing the 80 foot neon sign of the world-famous Crazy Crystals.
Baker Hotel in background.

This most unique sign has been one of my most enduring childhood memories. I was born in 1943 and it was there at that time, I'm sure, because there are other postcards or photographs that have been dated 1940. I got married in 1964, moved to Tennessee with my husband of a year, visited my hometown several times during the 25 years I lived away from Texas, and sometime during that time the sign was removed. I was so sick when I discovered the sign gone. I suppose progress has a way of doing that to you!

There are many websites that tell the story of the healing mineral waters of my hometown of Mineral Wells and the many wells and spas that drew thousands of visitors seeking the rejuvenating powers of these waters. You will find the story of their discovery and the subsequent growth of the town very in…

FLOYER Family

FLOYER
The Floyer name enters the already ancient 300 years of Homersley genealogy with William Homersley 1st x 9 Cousin of Garnett Holmes; (15th great grandson of Ade de Rowenwal, our common ancestor, and his daughter by an unknown wife, Margaret Homerlsey (1548-1597) who married Richard Flyer (1546-?) Hints, Stafford, England about 1571.

UK, Extracted Probate Records, London, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812 
NOTE: Margaret Homerlsey 1548-1597 is the 9th great grandaughter of Ade de Rowenwald.
They had a son, Ralph Flyor (3rd  x 5) 1572-1643, who resided at Oxford, England, married Margery Weston (1577-1609) England & Wales Christening Records, 1530-1906.



Ralph and Margery had four children; Richard, Francis, Mary, Lettice. 
Richard Flyor/Richard Floyer (29 Jul 1603 Hints, Stafford - 27 Aug 1679) married 21 Mar 1645 Manchester, Warwicke to Elizabeth Eleanor Babington (1618-1679) ; (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, "Ancestral File," databa…

Doc Gailey and His Sisters

Gailey Children James Dolphus Gailey Grace Amanda Gailey Nellie Mae Gailey
Children of James Newton Gailey and Eleanor Elizabeth Brock Brock Community, Parker County, Texas

My grandfather, James Dolphus "Doc" Gailey, had two younger sisters whom he adored. Grace and Nell were doted on by him and his parents and they grew up so attached to one another, their sibling love and devotion was a thing to be admired. I feel it gave all of their children and grandchildren an example to learn from and a standard to strive for. It was always such fun when the aunts came to visit. Some of you may remember that Doc and Grandma raised me so I, more often than not, call my mother's aunts my aunts, when in reality they were my great-aunts. And my sisters and I would usually go with Doc and Grandma to the aunts' houses to visit, so I find myself remembering things about them that my 1st cousins do not.
All three of Jim and Elizabeth's children were born in the Brock community of Parker …